04 December 2021

Section E: Accessibility Assessments

Accessibility assessments are an essential step to monitor the effective implementation of accessibility principles at various stages of a project, for existing buildings (physical assessment) and for new constructions (assessment based on architectural designs). Assessments should be as participatory as possible, to make sure that persons with disabilities are sensitized and involved in the process, and to collect their precious contributions and suggestions. Accessibility assessments are crucial to ensure the quality of the implemented interventions and to raise various stakeholders’ awareness of architectural barriers. SECTION E of this toolkit provides guidance for UNICEF’s teams and partner organizations on how to prepare and conduct accessibility assessments according to the situation and context. Part 1 focuses on the preparation of the assessment, from a methodological as well as technical perspective. Part 2 provides guidance on how to conduct the site visit during the physical assessment. Part 3 addresses the steps necessary after the site visit to register the assessment’s findings, identify measures to mitigate barriers and prioritize interventions.   Useful Links Download Accessibility Toolkit: Section E in English as PDF, EPUB, BRF, DAISY, HTML Download Accessibility Toolkit: All Sections in English as HTML Section G: Accessibility checklists TOOLBOX 1_Sample cover sheet - Accessibility Assessment TOOLBOX 1_Sample summary report TOOLBOX 1_Tips for measuring access TOOLBOX 1_ToR - Accessibility Assessment Consultant TOOLBOX 4_Accessibility levels for UNICEF offices
04 December 2021

Section D: Unicef and United Nations Premises

To achieve disability inclusion in UNICEF’s work, it is important to consider both operations and programmes. The understanding of accessibility as a concept often stems from ensuring our premises are accessible for all and we are “walking the talk”. Section D of the toolkit focuses on guidance, processes and procedures to help make UNICEF facilities more accessible. These tools could also be used to improve the common premises of the United Nations and the facilities of partner organizations. In particular, this section highlights key considerations for existing premises and facilities, including selecting appropriate locations and enhancing the accessibility of existing facilities in a systematic manner. UNICEF premises include buildings, office spaces, sub-offices, guest houses, warehouses and surrounding spaces, like pathways, car parks and courtyards. Part 1 explains UNICEF’s overall procurement protocol and the actors involved in the accessibility refurbishment of offices and premises. Part 2 integrates specific guidance for improving the accessibility of UNICEF’s existing premises and facilities as well as for choosing the new facility (owned or rented, exclusive or shared). A segment is also dedicated to the integration of accessibility considerations into safety and security procedures in UNICEF premises. Even if not covered in the toolkit, another important aspect related to an organizational priority is the reduction of UNICEF’s environmental footprint by cutting greenhouse gas emissions from air travel, vehicle fleets and facilities, and by decreasing water consumption, paper use, single-use plastics and waste.   Useful Links Download Accessibility Toolkit: Section D in English as PDF, EPUB, BRF, DAISY, HTML Download Accessibility Toolkit: All Sections in English as HTML TOOLBOX 1_ToR - Accessibility Assessment Consultant TOOLBOX 1_ToR - Accessibility Consultant TOOLBOX 2_Accessible safety and security TOOLBOX 4_UNICEF premises Disaster safety for people with disabilities Section G: Accessibility checklists
04 December 2021

Section C: Accessibility in Emergencies

Persons with disabilities are disproportionately affected by war, natural disasters and other crises, during which they are likely to experience discrimination and exclusion, despite the increasing efforts of humanitarian actors to adopt inclusive approaches. Even though frameworks and guidelines take diversity more and more into consideration, disaster management and humanitarian assistance are often designed to provide standardized solutions to an affected community without sufficient regard for the needs of diverse populations, such as persons with disabilities and older people, among other groups. This gap must be filled to ensure assistance to all, without discrimination and on an equal basis. As a condition for inclusion, accessibility needs to be addressed as a core component of disaster risk management and humanitarian action. Section D of the toolkit provides guidance for UNICEF’s teams and partner organizations on how to ensure that accessibility and disability inclusion are taken into account in emergencies, and not only in development contexts. Part 1 addresses the overarching aspects of accessibility in emergencies, such as the general principles and frameworks to be followed, the main stakeholders to be involved, data and approaches. Part 2 focuses on the identification of barriers and the main recommendations for typical humanitarian facilities inside and outside camp settings: shelters, WASH infrastructure, community buildings, distribution sites, etc. It also provides recommendations pertaining to communication-related accessibility measures, for example during hygiene promotion sessions. Part 3 provides an overview of how to address accessibility and participation during common activities and phases of humanitarian interventions   Useful Links Download Accessibility Toolkit: Section C in English as PDF, EPUB, BRF, DAISY, HTML Download Accessibility Toolkit: All Sections in English as HTML IASC Guidelines on the Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action, 2019_0.pdf (interagencystandingcommittee.org) Webinar on accessible construction and universal design in humanitarian settings Min 9:20 Section G: Accessibility checklists TOOLBOX 3_Thematic areas - emergency
04 December 2021

Section B: Programme-related Buildings

Accessibility is an essential aspect of UNICEF’s programme-related activities. The needs of persons with disabilities should always be taken into account, both in emergency and in development activities, including whenever infrastructure or equipment is concerned. Depending on the intervention’s complexity, the requirements can be connected to the design and construction of new buildings or to the renovation of existing ones. SECTION B of this toolkit aims to support UNICEF staff and partners in their efforts to ensure accessibility in all construction projects across all programme areas, including education, child protection, and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). Part 1 provides examples that are accessibility-specific to the various sectors of UNICEF’s work, such as education, WASH, child protection and health. NB: Accessibility within humanitarian action is addressed in Section D of this toolkit. Part 2 outlines UNICEF’s overall procurement protocol and the actors involved in programme-related accessibility interventions. Part 3 includes specific guidance for the construction of NEW programme-related buildings. Part 4 includes specific guidance for accessibility improvements in EXISTING programme-related buildings.   Useful links Download Accessibility Toolkit: Section B in English as PDF, EPUB, BRF, DAISY, HTML Download Accessibility Toolkit: All Sections in English as HTML Section G_Accessibility checklists TOOLBOX 1_ToR - Accessibility Assessment Consultant TOOLBOX 1_ToR - Accessibility Consultant TOOLBOX 2_Accessible safety and security TOOLBOX 3_Thematic areas Inclusive preparedness Accessible transportation for education